Oral habits: Practical strategies to get rid of them

By: Amber Fox, MS, CCC-SLP Oral habits such as thumb or finger sucking and prolonged pacifire use can be very tricky to extinguish! Here are some helpful tips in tackling these unwanted oral habits. Gather your team- make sure all caregivers are on board and following the same plan- consistency is key! Start early- straw cups can be introduced as…

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Crossing Midline

By: Erin Haugen, M/OTRL What does "cross midline" mean? Crossing midline is the act of moving our arms or legs across the midline of our body. Why is it important? Vital to the development of using both sides of the body together Facilitates coordination and communication between the left and right hemispheres of the brain Develops hand dominance Promotes fine…

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Facts about a Concussion

By: Amber Fredrickson, DPT What is a concussion? A concussion is a brain injury caused by a direct or indirect force to the head or body that changes how the brain functions. General symptoms: Headache Dizziness Nausea/vomiting Sleep disturbances Drowsiness Poor balance and coordination Visual problems Sensitivity to light or noise Fogginess Difficulty concentrating Poor memory Emotional changes including anxiety,…

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Echolalia: The facts beyond “parrot talk”, scripting, and echoing

By: Amber Fox, MS, CCC-SLP What is echolalia? Echolalia is the literal and rote repetition of the speech of others. In young or typically developing children, echolalia presents as imitation and can be part of typical language development from ages 18 months to 30 month of age. Echolalia and scripted language are often associated with children on the autism spectrum;…

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Does your child W-sit?

By: Laura Kendall, DPT Do your kids sit with their knees and feet out to the sides? Often in the shape of a W? W-sitting is commonly seen in children and is not recommended as a preferred sitting posture when playing on the floor. In fact, we suggest you have your child avoid this position. Children choose to W-sit for…

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How Physical Therapy Can Help with Toe Walking

By: Holly Thompson, DPT Do you notice your child walking on their toes throughout the day? Do they prefer to be up on their toes rather than keeping their feet flat when they are standing and walking? By two years old, children typically demonstrate a heel-toe walking pattern. While toe walking may appear harmless, over time it can cause secondary…

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Haircuts: Why they are tough for kids with sensory processing difficulties

By: Brianna Mittelsteadt, OTR/L Many people find going to the salon or barber shop a treat; scalp massages, a fresh new look, lovely smelling shampoo, maybe even a sucker when you are done. There are many individuals who have the opposite experience: children and individuals with sensory processing difficulties. Let’s quick talk about what sensory processing difficulties mean. Sensory processing…

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Fitness and Mental Health

Article provided by: Mental Health America Does your family focus on fitness? Do You Focus on Fitness #4Mind4Body? Mental health is essential to everyone’s overall health and well-being, and mental illnesses are common and treatable. So much of what we do physically impacts us mentally –it’s important to pay attention to both your physical health and your mental health, which…

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