The Importance of Teletherapy Today

By: Erin Imsland, Occupational Therapist Teletherapy is the online delivery of therapy services through a live video connection. As many of you know, Red Door has moved to teletherapy services for a little while due to the concerns regarding COVID-19 in hopes of slowing the spread and keeping our community safe. Some of us had the opportunity to provide these…

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Planning for Your Child’s Future

By: Jessica Oswald, Occupational Therapist Parents wonder about their children's futures at a very early age. Questions they ask may include: What will my child be when they grow up? Where will they live? Will they attend post secondary education of some kind? Parents of children with medical diagnoses or disabilities consider many of these same questions, but also find…

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Health Insurance Policies: Questions you should ask!

By: Jessica Oswald, Therapy Coordinator Insurance plans and policies are all different and can be so confusing! Let us give you some basic facts and terminology so that you are better able to understand the jargony language of insurance and third party payers. Keep in mind that therapy services (speech, occupational, and physical therapy) and counseling services are often handled…

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Torticollis

By: Laura Kendall, DPT Exploration of the world starts in infancy. Some infants, however, have limited motion, specifically with their neck. This is often due to a tight neck muscle, typically the sternocleidomastoid, and is called torticollis. Torticollis is a condition that occurs in infants and can be diagnosed shortly after birth. Torticollis can also be identified in the first…

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Early Communication Skills

By: Mandy Griffin, MS, CCC-SLP Parents seek the advice of Speech Language Pathologists (SLPs) when there is concern that their child isn’t talking. There are several early communication skills that SLPs observe well before a child’s first words appear. These skills emerge shortly after birth and continue to develop beyond their first birthday. What skills should emerge in the early…

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All things /s/!

By: Mandy Griffin, MS CCC-SLP We typically see /s/ emerge around the age three, though kids often use it during play and in babble much earlier than that. The production of /s/ is made using the sides of the tongue to elevate and meet the palate (roof of the mouth). The middle of the tongue is down, making a groove…

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HELP! How can I get my toddler to communicate?

By: Jorden Beckman, MS CCC-SLP There may be a variety of reasons why your child is not yet talking, but one reason may be that you already anticipate their wants and needs before they have to communicate with you. It is important to let your child take the lead to promote communication with you and to help develop those words…

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Time in the Car: Making it Productive

By: Kelli Ellenbaum, MS, CCC-SLP Parents often find themselves spending a lot of time in the car. Whether this includes running errands, driving kids to school or appointments, or transporting children to activities, a parent’s vehicle be the vessel that contains many things. It can be a place of meals/snacks, a daily recap conversations, some ongoing learning, a therapy session,…

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Mealtime: Establishing Routines

By: Geena Schmidt, OTR/L, Mary Dahly, OTR/L & Lindsay Jolley, COTA The mealtime routine is important for families in order to encourage healthy habits, communication, and to deepen family connections. Children especially benefit from mealtime because of the abundant opportunities to learn life long skills. Some of these lifelong skills include: meal preparation, responsibilities, manners, establishing healthy routines, and relating…

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